• What Do You Know About Coopering?
    Various events brought me to a new project idea. And this has to do with coopering. To explain the new project I have to reach out a bit. I love to read and to soak up information. A few weeks ago I read Mr. Schwartz blog post about one of his upcoming projects - a dust pan. Reading the post I thought that this of course is a fun project. And if you will read the article attentive ... read more
    Source: Blue Spruce WoodshopPublished on 2017-02-22
  • paper towel holder pt III…….
    There is only going to be a part IV and V.  I was expecting to get all of the woodworking related tasks done tonight but I lost a bounce test. A minor hiccup that was easily fixed and it really didn't matter much. I still have to wait for the spindles for the gallery rail to come in before I can keep on going with it.two coats on itLast night after dinner I went back to the shop to look ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-02-22
  • Results in on Silverline Spokeshaves
    From my journal Monday 20th February 2017 Just before the weekend I picked up another spokeshave but this time it was first under £5. At first glance you would say, “This’ll work, surely.” After all, all the component parts seemed to be there. The reason I picked this one out is because someone messaged me and … Read the full post Results in on Silverline Spokeshaves on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2017-02-22
  • Hot Oil Treatment
    If you’ve seen my noggin, you know this post won’t be about hair care.  Over the weekend, I finished the dry-stage carving of an ale bowl I had roughed out a couple months ago.  I thought it might be a good opportunity to briefly discuss my oiling procedure. The most important factor in finishing is the quality of the final cuts.  A properly sharpened edge will leave a cleanly cut, almost burnished, surface behind. Once the carving ... read more
    Source: David Fisher, Carving ExplorationsPublished on 2017-02-22
  • How Do I Spell Filletster? C – O – O- L…
    I have always been leery of Facebook and I didn't take the plunge with it for years. Finally, I jumped and while it was great keeping up to date with friends and relatives, I still tended to go back every few months and delete whatever I could find that I had posted previously. Paranoid? Probably, but who ever said I was rational?After Donald Trump won the election, however, things very quickly changed. I'm not going to get into a political ... read more
    Source: The Part-Time WoodworkerPublished on 2017-02-21
  • A Video Tour of a Deluxe Roubo Book
    If you have never seen one of our deluxe versions of “To Make as Perfectly as Possible: Roubo on Marquetry,” this tour will give you a small taste of the scale of the book and the quality of its components. Since the release of this book (it’s long since sold out), people have come by the storefront or to shows to see a copy and it’s always a treat to see their reaction. First, they are amazed at the ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-02-21
  • The Black Dog Workshop
    Like most amateurs in any craft, I rely heavily on my maestros and gurus, and for me, help comes in the form of YouTube videos more than anything else. When it comes to hand tool woodworking, I invariably turn to the likes of Paul Sellers and Tom Fidgen. When I need advice about woodturning, my ‘go to’ guys are Mike Waldt and Martin Saban-Smith. The latter of these chaps is the developer of Hampshire Sheen, a woodturning finishing ... read more
    Source: goatboy’s woodshopPublished on 2017-02-21
  • They Should Have Know Better…
    Today’s parable of the movement of wood concerns this George III Linen Press: This lot has sold for $380. Furniture is soft right now. Description:  Circa 1800, two-part form, high-grade burlwood mahogany veneers, mahogany, pine secondary, applied arched cornice with ebonized line inlay above a vertically veneered frieze, upper cabinet with two hinged doors, center with an applied reeded brass mount, each door featuring a rectangular panel with an inset square to each corner, interior with four pull-out linen drawers, base with ... read more
    Source: The Furniture RecordPublished on 2017-02-21
  • Why did the screw hole location changed on Stanley type irons?
    Part 2 of my answer to ralph of the Accidental woodworker You know the "hole" the one that used to be located near the top of the ironPretty well all used up Adam & Co blade showing typical hole at the topFound inside an American Arrowmammett work planeThat hole was first introduced to facilitate removing and installing the new fangled cap iron making the blade a double iron. Such double iron first appears around 1760. That long slot is required in ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2017-02-21
  • Why did the screw hole location changed on Stanley type irons?
    Part 2 of my answer to ralph of the Accidental woodworker You know the "hole" the one that used to be located near the top of the ironPretty well all used up Adam & Co blade showing typical hole at the topFound inside an American Arrowmammett work planeThat hole was first introduced to facilitate removing and installing the new fangled cap iron making the blade a double iron. Such double iron first appears around 1760. That long slot is required in ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2017-02-21
  • How to Support the Endangered Alphabets
    Through February 26th 2017 we are running a crowdfunding campaign to produce a children’s pictorial dictionary in endangered languages of Bangladesh, and we urgently need your support at https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1496420787/100-words-for-a-childrens-endangered-language-dict/. As you may know, Kickstarter is all or nothing: unless we meet our $10,000 goal, we get zero. For those who prefer not to work through a third party, you can support us directly at www.endangeredalphabets.com/donate. The Endangered Alphabets Project is a federal 501c3 non-profit. Thanks! And if you have questions, ... read more
    Source: Endangered alphabetsPublished on 2017-02-21
  • Well-known Japanese saw aficionado Ron Herman, at the…
    Well-known Japanese saw aficionado Ron Herman, at the Woodworking Show in New Jersey last weekend, explaining how he sets up saws and scrapers (!) differently for softwood and hardwood species, with an example of some of his crosscut saws. And you thought only crazy Japanese woodworkers would go to that much trouble tweaking the setup of their tools. ... read more
    Source: Giant CypressPublished on 2017-02-21
  • Info on coach making tools?
    This beautiful coachmakers plough plane went past my limit last week on a well-known auction site. I should have gone higher, but a limit is a limit. It’s a stunning tool with a fence that will work around curves, such as a coachmaker might require. I have had so many coachmaker-related tools of this kind pass through my lock-up, I’m more and more keen to find a book that shows the variety and uses of all the different types. Like ... read more
    Source: Hackney ToolsPublished on 2017-02-21
  • Let the bowl speak for itself
    Source: Rivers JoineryPublished on 2017-02-21
  • towel holder pt II……….
    I took another 'take it easy' day.  It was a day off from work for me and I did nothing on the cabinet installation except to call a few plumbers. None were interested in doing a little piddly job like move some pipes. One did say that is was free at the end of March and could I wait that long? By the time I got done doing this I was ready for something else so I went on a ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-02-21
  • All those planes in catalogs seemed *so* cheap.
    It’s hard not to look at historical catalogs and be in awe at how cheap those planes seem. In an 1894 Sargent catalog, a low-end No.107 block plane sold for $0.60, whilst the highest end plane, whilst the No.1317 with all the bells and whistles sold for $2.05. Doesn’t seem like a lot. How much is it really? In this period, the average income for a family living in the northeast was $748.81, of which the major expenditure was on food ... read more
    Source: Working by handPublished on 2017-02-21
  • My Lucky Scars
    When I was about 11, my parents took a trip to Cancun and left us with Hazel, a Nurse Ratched type with a beehive hairdo, a messed-up back and a matching disposition. It was Halloween, and so we were carving pumpkins in the garage. I was using my Cub Scout knife – improperly. The knife slipped and slashed the web between the thumb and index finger on my left hand. […] The post My Lucky Scars appeared first on Popular ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2017-02-20
  • S s S or Stanley? And the differences would be….
    I was going to respond to my friend Ralph of the Accidental Woodworker about questions he had on a recent find he got, a Stanley iron stamped SsS. What gives? And what about the hole location moving on Stanley irons, then followed by everyone else... Why?Pic of "new" blade acquired by Ralph.Notice the hole position on the top also.Pic from RalphThen I thought my response was getting too long, better save it as a blog entry...What's in a name, SiegleyJacob ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2017-02-20
  • S s S or Stanley? And the differences would be….
    I was going to respond to my friend Ralph of the Accidental Woodworker about questions he had on a recent find he got, a Stanley iron stamped SsS. What gives? And what about the hole location moving on Stanley irons, then followed by everyone else... Why?Pic of "new" blade acquired by Ralph.Notice the hole position on the top also.Pic from RalphThen I thought my response was getting too long, better save it as a blog entry...What's in a name, SiegleyJacob ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2017-02-20
  • Worry Coach
    I’ve decided that I need to hire myself out as a coach to the needy woodworkers out there. I will be a Worry Coach. You have too much to do getting stuff made. Let me take on the chore of worry for you. Did you cut those joints too loose? Don’t worry about it. I’ll do that for you. And yes they will fall apart, but long after you’re gone. Don’t worry! Are you worried that your finish might run ... read more
    Source: Northwest Woodworking StudioPublished on 2017-02-20
  • Worry Coach
    I’ve decided that I need to hire myself out as a coach to the needy woodworkers out there. I will be a Worry Coach. You have too much to do getting stuff made. Let me take on the chore of worry for you. Did you cut those joints too loose? Don’t worry about it. I’ll do that for you. And yes they will fall apart, but long after you’re gone. Don’t worry! Are you worried that your finish might run ... read more
    Source: The North West WoodworkingPublished on 2017-02-20
  • Texas Red
    For every Texan worth his salt there are two truths: The only "real" BBQ comes from Texas and the best is __________ (fill in the blank) and they personally make the best Chili to be found anywhere.What started me down this road today was making a pot of Chili this morning. BTW, Chili does not have beans or tomatoes in it, if it does it is bean or tomato soup. A proper bowel of red will have sliced and cubed ... read more
    Source: I’M A OK GUYPublished on 2017-02-20
  • Wednesday: Deluxe ‘Roubo on Furniture’
    We will begin taking pre-publication orders for the deluxe version of “With All the Precision Possible: Roubo on Furniture” at noon Eastern time on Wednesday, Feb. 22. The book will be $550, which includes delivery to the U.S. and Canada. International customers will pay an additional charge based on the actual cost to ship it to them (you’ll be contacted before the book ships about this additional charge). We are printing 1,000 copies. No more. This book is expected to ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-02-20
  • Q & A Interview with Steve Hewson from Triton Tools
    Steve Hewson from Triton tools came to the studio to talk tools and do a Q&A interview. I hope you enjoy the interview for I surely did. Cheers,FR ... read more
    Source: Freddy RomanPublished on 2017-02-20
  • Hand planes (how to use and maintain)
    So this week I have three new videos uploaded to my YouTube channel. In these videos I discuss how hand planes have evolved over the centuries. I also break down a few handplanes and talk about the components of hand planes. Some components are common between hand planes, other components are specific to certain specialty hand planes. The videos discuss my preference for hand planes and why and how I use them. So I go into more detail about handplane ... read more
    Source: The Refined EdgePublished on 2017-02-20
  • Build A Bench with Jeff Miller this April
    If you'd like to spend a couple weekends building a Roubo-style bench with Jeff Miller, here's your chance.Over two weekends (March 31-April 2, and April 7-9) Jeff is offering the class at his shop in Chicago where you'll get instruction from one of today's best modern furniture makers. Jeff has extensive experience building this bench, and installing our vises. Most of the benches in Jeff's shop are outfitted with our stuff, and he has an intimate knowledge of how they ... read more
    Source: BenchcraftedPublished on 2017-02-20
  • That was Easy!
    So it only took about an hour to knock together the bulk of the new crochet. Before I bolt it to the benchtop, however, I’d like to test a theory.  Crochets without screws work via a wedging action.  Even though mine has a screw, I’d still like to test out a wedge.  So I’m making […] ... read more
    Source: The apartment woodworkerPublished on 2017-02-20
  • I paid the price, big time……..
    I moved around yesterday like I was a young kid. I refused to give in and take it slow. Putting in that corner cabinet really pissed me off. I flew up and down the cellar stairs getting tools and whatever else I needed. Later on that night about 2000, my right leg (with the metal hip) starting hurting. I also had trouble walking and I couldn't take a full stride.I didn't think much of it and thought that after a ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-02-20
  • From Lowly Can Opener to Mortise Clean-out Tool
    Wednesday 15th February 2017 I know, I should have just made one or two of these years ago. I knew exactly what I wanted but was too lazy to just make one. Fast forward and I decided to do something about it so here it is. What to call it?? Waste extractor? Chip remover? You help … Read the full post From Lowly Can Opener to Mortise Clean-out Tool on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2017-02-20
  • This is why we’re taking on this project
    These are the people we want to be able to serve: the roughly 700,000 people of the Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. Specifically the dozen or so ethnic peoples who have lived in this region for centuries, farming, fishing, weaving some of the most beautiful textiles in the world. They are in grave and imminent danger of losing their language, and especially their written language, and everything that entails. The schools we partner with are doing something innovative ... read more
    Source: Endangered alphabetsPublished on 2017-02-20