• I’m Back
    Gorse flowering on Lynchmere Common SO it’s not that easy to get rid of me after all?  Last time I looked it was the depths of Winter and now Spring has been rushing past in it’s usual way with a frantic list of things to do. Tidying up  after the winter work, plenty of maintenance and then straight into the summer season of events, courses, bracken management and charcoal making to name but a few. Writing up blog ... read more
    Source: Woodlandantics BlogPublished on 2017-05-25
  • disaster day…..
    Had one major and one minor disaster today. The major one sucks and it'll be expensive to fix. The minor one is more of an 'aw shit', toss it, and start over again. My canon camera failed the bounce test with Mr. Concrete floor again for the 3rd time. The lens won't open or retract all the time and I get a  lens error when it doesn't open or close. I got it to work a few times by manually ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-05-25
  • Use a Drill to Shape a Chair Seat
    Though I’ve built a lot of chairs, I don’t own an adze, which is used to roughly shape a plank seat so it has a buttocks-shaped depression. I also don’t own any of the typical power-tool solutions, such as an angle grinder outfitted with a special cutter for seats. Instead, I have a scorp, which is like a drawknife that was bent around a telephone pole. It’s much slower in […] The post Use a Drill to Shape a Chair ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Now in Store: H.O. Studley Posters
    You can now purchase our poster of the H.O. Studley tool cabinet for $20. That price includes shipping anywhere in the United States and Canada. Our poster features an image of the cabinet taken by Narayan Nayar, the photographer for the book “Virtuoso: The Tool Cabinet and Workbench of H.O. Studley.” The 13” x 19” poster is printed in the United States on 80 lb. recycled stock with a matte coating and ships in a rigid tube. Note that ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Working with a Radial Arm Saw
    First a confession:  My first real stationary power tool was a Radial Arm Saw, A 1965 Craftsman model... The kind that got recalled in the early 2000 for a safety hazard with the guard. Apparently you could cut yourself with it... Really!!This was followed by a bandsaw and later a newer Unisaw.Circa 90s. Me posing proudly with my first Unisaw, the old Craftsman RAS is in the background.There was a wide range of models affected and the fix was ; Send ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Working with a Radial Arm Saw
    First a confession:  My first real stationary power tool was a Radial Arm Saw, A 1965 Craftsman model... The kind that got recalled in the early 2000 for a safety hazard with the guard. Apparently you could cut yourself with it... Really!!This was followed by a bandsaw and later a newer Unisaw.Circa 90s. Me posing proudly with my first Unisaw, the old Craftsman RAS is in the background.There was a wide range of models affected and the fix was ; Send ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Adding Context to Your Models With Match Photo
    In the video Dave Richards will show you how he uses Match Photo to import an image, and create a simple model ... read more
  • Re Easy Angled Tenons Article In Fine Woodworking
    A few years ago a contributor to Fine Woodworking, Jeff Miller, made a horrendous blunder in stating that in-line tenons were commonly used in chair making by furniture makers because they were stronger. His assertion was untrue, and I felt I needed to help balance out the issue at the time. It’s this kind of flawed comment that shapes … Read the full post Re Easy Angled Tenons Article In Fine Woodworking on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Kill your darlings
    As a writer, you have to learn to kill your darlings – to hit “delete” on those hard-won, witty sentences and paragraphs to which you are irrationally attached, but which also obscure the truly necessary words in meandering mediocrity. (See the preceding sentence for a good example of what I’m talking about.) It is hard to admit that the words you have slaved over may not actually be the words you need. And now, for the analogue… During the last few months I ... read more
    Source: The Daily SkepPublished on 2017-05-24
  • New paint colors invented by neural network
    lewisandquark: So if you’ve ever picked out paint, you know that every infinitesimally different shade of blue, beige, and gray has its own descriptive, attractive name. Tuscan sunrise, blushing pear, Tradewind, etc… There are in fact people who invent these names for a living. But given that the human eye can see millions of distinct colors, sooner or later we’re going to run out of good names. Can AI help? For this experiment, I gave the neural network a ... read more
    Source: Giant CypressPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Plane Spotting for the Deeply Curious
    First of all, thanks to everyone who met us in Amana for Handworks 2017, and to Jameel and Father John of Benchcrafted for putting on another great event. Thanks as well for the great reception our poster has gotten. For it I have to thank Tim, TFWW's designer, and Kate, our poster designer. And I want to thank our favorite woodwright for this photo. I constantly get asked which plane is which, and while our limited edition poster on plane ... read more
    Source: Tools for woodworkingPublished on 2017-05-24
  • started the new stone holder…….
    Today was mostly sunny but now that the day is almost done, it is turning more and more cloudy. According to the weather seers, this is the last sun we'll see until next week. Each day is neither forecasted to be cloudy or will rain with some days having both. As long as it doesn't rain in the shop I'll be a happy camper.an oops The beading plane veered off and I left a long divot here. Rather then replace it, ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-05-24
  • The mighty New Zealand Kauri tree
    One of my favourite trees is Agathis australis, more commonly known as the kauri tree. Whilst California has the giant sequoias, the kauri is New Zealand’s behemoth. Whilst they may only grow 50m tall, they can grow up to 4m in diameter. The largest is Tane Mahuta, Maori for “Lord of the Forest”, and is supposedly somewhere between 1250-2500 years old. Tane Mahuta Don’t let the name Agathis australis fool you though, these pine trees are only found in New Zealand, and then only ... read more
    Source: Working by handPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Mystery Tool
    Several years ago I picked up this little tool at an antique store. It works great for tracing shapes accurately. I had quite a few questions today about it, and I don’t know what it is called or if it can still be purchased. If anyone can identify this thing or where one could be bought please comment. — Will MyersFiled under: Uncategorized ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Octagonal Legs
    A couple months ago I filmed an Octagonal Side Table DVD and a Milk Painting DVD with Popular Woodworking. They should be out sometime this summer. Here’s a photo of the table:   To film a DVD you need lots of parts at various stages, so I made a pile of bent octagonal legs one morning: 10:03AM 10:12: Fourteen riven legs 10:47: All squared 10:54: Cut to length 10:57: Marked 10:59  Coffee break 11:32:  1st leg shaved 12:37:  All shaved! ... read more
    Source: Elia BizzarriPublished on 2017-05-24
  • Yellow Dusters-Don’t Believe the National Trust
    Biting Back The yellow duster is unbeatable for trapping dust, taking it outdoors safely and shaking it out to the four winds. Its fibrous soft fibres are the very thing that make it work the best. I am guessing that these National Trust leaders and advisers are not of the generation that actually dusted much of anything … Read the full post Yellow Dusters-Don’t Believe the National Trust on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2017-05-23
  • Just checking in (and an announcement for my European customers)
    The last several months have been taxing on both a personal and business level; the death of my brother, an unexpected surge in orders, developing a saw sharpening class for Lie-Nielsen, and outfitting myself for upcoming woodworking shows all met in one great confluence. Over the last several years, I’ve tried my best to turn most orders around in a week or so. The events of the last few months have stretched that turnaround time to an uncomfortable level. Now, ... read more
    Source: Blackburn ToolsPublished on 2017-05-23
  • Abandon all wallets, ye who enter Handworks 2017
    A mundane comedy by Fine Woodworking poet laureate, Barry NM Dima ... read more
  • Festool Vecturo – A Knife for Wood
    In the May 2017 issue of Festool Heaven, Jim Randolph shares a quick story on how his first use of the Festool Vecturo oscillating tool helped finish a challenging job quickly and easily. I’d had my new Festool Vecturo for only 24 hours before I had a job for it…After several hours of clerical work, I was ready for some woodworking. A DIY job would be as close as I could get. When our plumber Terry assessed a job we asked him to ... read more
    Source: Highland Woodworking BlogPublished on 2017-05-23
  • Not Quite NASA Grade
    I am pretty much finished with the new Dutch tool chest build. The lid went on fairly easily (with some fine-tuning) and I’ve stuffed it to the gills.  I had contemplated French-fitting the upper compartment, but ultimately decided against it. This tool chest will not travel, so there is no great benefit to dividers. Instead, […] ... read more
    Source: The apartment woodworkerPublished on 2017-05-23
  • It was 50 years ago today.
    It was 50 years ago today. ... read more
    Source: Giant CypressPublished on 2017-05-23
  • Sprawled Below Tables and Chairs
    Sprawled Below Tables and Chairs: Suzanne Ellison, on the lengths folks will go to in the pursuit of figuring out how furniture was made:We still need those curious and intrepid souls who enjoy exploring out-of-the-way shops and regional museums and know how to charm their way into taking a closer look at that one piece that has caught their eye. If need be, they are perfectly willing to sprawl on the floor and get a bit dusty.I completely understand. In ... read more
    Source: Giant CypressPublished on 2017-05-23
  • the rain is back…..
    I thought april showers bring may flowers. It seems the rain and flowers, along with months, are on different schedules. We just had a couple of warm, humid,sunny days, and the forecast is for rain or cloudy skies right through memorial day weekend. And this after going through a week plus of the same crap. The temps are much cooler hanging out in the high 50's/low 60's which is perfect for me. I don't work wood outside so the cloudy or rainy ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-05-23
  • Wood-sample collection chest 4 – carvings for front and side panels completed
    Working on the front panel With the front panel redesigned to be flatter and less delicate in order to accommodate a drop-front on the chest, carving commenced. I picked a piece of mahogany because I liked its color, and I’ve struggled ever since with changing grain direction.  Every quarter inch or so, the direction takes a reverse turn, and I’ve learned a lot about wood selection and reading the grain for carving. It’s been a challenge, but I finally finished the ... read more
    Source: autumndoucetPublished on 2017-05-23
  • Picture This CVIII
    I have previously mentioned cross-grained mouldings (here and here) which, though out-of-period, are authentic. The walnut chest-on-chest below is from the second quarter of the eighteenth-century and displays customary cross-grain banding and vertical veneer on the drawer fronts. Fig. 1. … Continue reading ... read more
    Source: Pegs and ‘TailsPublished on 2017-05-23
  • The Sydney Fair 2017
    The Sydney Fair (25-28 May 2017) at the Royal Hall of Industries Moore Park will be the largest International quality event for 10 years.  Over 50 of Australia’s outstanding dealers will be exhibiting (and selling) Furniture, Decorative Arts, Jewellery, Art, … Continue reading ... read more
    Source: Pegs and ‘TailsPublished on 2017-05-23
  • Barrel stand Day 4
    Day 4 started with me turning the furnace back on this morning... it's a tad cold.We were supposed to go back to the nursery this morning, but we waited for the temps to go up a bit.Apparently I have money burning my pocket so we have to go spend it on flowers... Huh, no tools? :-)Our flower production won't be enough for this year so we will supplement it for faster results 🙂Well there goes my pocket money for this ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2017-05-22
  • Barrel stand Day 4
    Day 4 started with me turning the furnace back on this morning... it's a tad cold.We were supposed to go back to the nursery this morning, but we waited for the temps to go up a bit.Apparently I have money burning my pocket so we have to go spend it on flowers... Huh, no tools? :-)Our flower production won't be enough for this year so we will supplement it for faster results 🙂Well there goes my pocket money for this ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2017-05-22
  • The Best Rainy Day…
    Dreary days tend to make me dreary; it’s like I never fully wake up. Today has been one of the best rainy days I have ever had, fully awake and hitting on all cylinders. I am visiting Hancock Shaker Village working on documenting several more pieces in their collection. Since my last visit, about 200 items that had been in a traveling exhibit the past few years have returned. Issac N. Youngs wall clock #21 in its traveling case. ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-05-22
  • The Galbert School of Craft
    That's right, the time has come, I am beginning to scout out locations and facilities in southern Maine for a school. After a couple of years of transition and quiet following my move and book release, I am ready to put together a school dedicated to teaching small groups of people chair making and also roping in some of my most gifted friends to share their talent and energy as well.  My goal is to keep things intimate and relaxed, ... read more
    Source: Chair NotesPublished on 2017-05-22