• A bit about me…
    As I thought that leaving an empty profile was not really very appealing I just completed it with some more info about me. I am not very keen to talk about myself so I did my best.In no way I would pretend to be a highly skilled woodworker and I am just learning more and more everyday. I do not like the term "self learner" as at the end we always learn from somebody else but this is the best ... read more
    Source: The Off-grid WoodbutcherPublished on 2019-03-14
  • Drawbore Pegs
    After installing the till front and bottom and being pleased with how everything was fitting together, I disassembled the chest into some twenty-four individual pieces. After a bit of sanding, I bored holes in the tenon in preparation for drawboring. But before any assembly could take place I need to make a few drawbore pegs. […] ... read more
    Source: An Unplugged WoodworkerPublished on 2019-03-14
  • Some woodworking now!
    After so much time spent on vintage tools time has come for some "real" woodworking.I like to work on many projects at the same time so I can jump from one to another and do not get fed up. On the other hand, each project is taking longer to deliver but I am not doing this for a living so this is no problem for me, maybe more a problem for my wife 🙂 At of today my two ongoing projects ... read more
    Source: The Off-grid WoodbutcherPublished on 2019-03-14
  • Vintage tools: Stanley #71 & #71 1/2 router plane restoration – part 2
    Today the planes knobs as well as the wood soles received their shellac coats.For the knobs, I used a crew as an handle to be able to dip it in shellac so to avoid any brush mark, that worked very well.I used a screw to dip the knobs in shellac.After three coats the the knobs were looking pretty good and went back to were they should be.The knobs attached back to their plane.While waiting for the soles to dry I ... read more
    Source: The Off-grid WoodbutcherPublished on 2019-03-14
  • Take a breath
    It’s hard being seven, six and four years old. At least it was the other day at our house. I don’t know what was in the water where we live last Saturday, but I can tell you what was in the air – cries of “THIS IS A DISASTER!” and “THIS IS IMPOSSIBLE!!!!” mixed with a healthy dose of “IT’S RUINED!!!” for good measure. It seemed like every time I turned around one of my daughters was bringing me a ... read more
    Source: The Daily SkepPublished on 2019-03-14
  • 17th Century Resin?
    So, y’know when you have an odd idea and you can’t be sure if it’s good or terrible?The oak carving is going okay. But depressingly regularly, while cutting away the background, a piece of the foreground chips off. Sometimes I can fix it with CA glue, sometimes I can soften out the edges so it looks like it was supposed to be rounded instead of oops-broke-a-bit, but I kept wondering about how well the box would hold up if it’s ... read more
    Source: Stochastic GeometryPublished on 2019-03-13
  • What Are You?
    Perhaps I should say, “Who Are You? Periodically I wrestle with the terms adopted to describe a certain category of woodworking and then other crafts generally too. Somehow it’s an effort to slot people into a more suited category, you know, to match their skill sets. On the one hand you have professional and master […] Read the full post What Are You? on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2019-03-13
  • Baritone Ukulele Completed
    As I’ve been applying Tru-Oil ( one coat a day) to Dave’s e-mando, I thought it a good time to finally complete the baritone uke that I started about 6 years ago! As I’ve said before, my baritone ukes are just not economically viable to build any more. It’s very much built as a small classical guitar; fan-braced, dovetail neck joint, double hole bridge etc. and takes almost as much time to build as a guitar. So, as this instrument ... read more
    Source: A Luthier’s BlogPublished on 2019-03-13
  • Woodworking with the Young Woodworker
    Ever thought about having your child join you in your shop but don’t know where to begin? Glenn Palmieri offers a few good tips to keep in mind if you want to get your kids started in woodworking in this article published in the March edition of Wood News Online. The post Woodworking with the Young Woodworker appeared first on Woodworking Blog. ... read more
    Source: Highland Woodworking BlogPublished on 2019-03-13
  • Japanese Toolbox-Style Humidor
    The finished humidor.I've recently found myself with a box of fine cigars. The great thing about cigars is that it's a great thing to do socially. I.e., you sit around with good friends who also smoke cigars, and contemplate how good life is. That's really all you can do while smoking a cigar.A fine cigar with a great friend in a good beer garden. What could be better?I've never smoked cigarettes. I'm sorry, but that seems to be a filthy ... read more
    Source: ToolerablePublished on 2019-03-13
  • Classes and a Visit to the Guggenheim (Things You Can Do With Poured Concrete)
    This past Saturday Sally and I spent the evening at the Guggenheim Museum. Saturday nights starting at 5:00 PM the museum has a "pay what you wish" admission fee (rather than $25 per adult) so we were greeted with a line that extended around the corner. The night was relatively balmy, and soon enough we were admitted.The museum's major exhibit was Hilma af Klint. (1862- 1944), a Swedish pioneer of abstract art -- the first major solo show in the ... read more
    Source: Joel’s Blog at Tools for Working WoodPublished on 2019-03-13
  • The Till
    With the chest frame and panels complete, things are moving right along. One last task before securing everything with drawbore pegs. The till. As mentioned before the till is a rather simple little contrivance, yet it can be quite the nightmare. The three pieces of the till, the front, bottom, and lid are wedged between […] ... read more
    Source: An Unplugged WoodworkerPublished on 2019-03-12
  • Karen asked me…….
    She needed a ride home. Her son-in-law has some kind a virus and her daughter usually brings her home from work. Karen didn't want to risk catching it and getting sick so it was, "...Ralph could you....."? Of course I said yes.Giving her a ride home ate up all my shop time tonight. It hit 50F (10C) today which felt real nice. I was able to drive home on Warwick Ave with the window down. Of course with it being ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2019-03-12
  • An Alternate Ending for F+W Media
    1507_danaF+W’s old building on Dana Ave. They owned it outright. Then…. F+W Media Inc., the parent of my beloved Popular Woodworking Magazine, filed for bankruptcy protection under Chapter 11 on Sunday, reporting it has more than $100 million in debt and a host of problems with its e-commerce ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2019-03-11
  • Chop, chop, chop… slice?
    A (rare these days) workday evening half-hour in the shed, so onto the side panels. End vice, does’ foot, holdfast, all the hold-it-down-on-a-flat-surface tools I have and it still jumps about if I’m carving towards the edge of the bench. Now I know why Peter Follansbee nails his work down to a large pine board before carving. The joys of having a lot of good material and elbow room 😀 Still, the new gouges did well enough, the carving ... read more
    Source: Stochastic GeometryPublished on 2019-03-11
  • Vintage tools: Stanley #71 & #71 1/2 router plane restoration
    Recently I got 2 router planes at auction, a Stanley #71 type 9 and a Stanley #71 1/2 type 3. They are both in correct condition but need a good cleanup. They are also both incomplete, the #71 is missing the depth post and stop and the #71 1/2 is missing depth adjustment wheel so I will need to find the missing parts.First step of the restoration was to disassemble the planes, removing all parts and knobs. I then gave ... read more
    Source: The Off-grid WoodbutcherPublished on 2019-03-11
  • Vintage tools: Stanley 246 miter box – Final
    Finally we are there, the restoration of the miter box and saw is done.Saw tote is back on its blade and the sacrificial board is fixed to the metal base.The box is back screwed on its stand that has received its coats of stain, oil and shellac.The Stanley 246 fully restored and fixed to its stand.Overall the miter box and saw look great and works great too.It was a very nice projects and will be a very useful addition to ... read more
    Source: The Off-grid WoodbutcherPublished on 2019-03-11
  • These Blind Woodturners Are An Inspiration
    As a young man, Christopher Fisher, the Blind Woodturner, lost his eyesight. Four years later, he decided he wanted to learn to turn wood. ... read more
  • These Blind Woodturners Are An Inspiration
    As a young man, Christopher Fisher, the Blind Woodturner, lost his eyesight. Four years later, he decided he wanted to learn to turn wood. ... read more
  • Space I Make
    My workbench has always anchored me. It’s the epicentre of my work, the hub from which all of the pieces I ever made came from. The designs for US senators and then too even a US President and the Permanent Collection of the Whitehouse pieces I designed came from no place fancy at all. Mostly […] Read the full post Space I Make on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2019-03-11
  • Outdoor Projects 2019
    Online Extras for Outdoor Projects 2019    Video: Angled Arms New Hampshire furniture maker and TV host Tom McLaughlin shows that making the angled arms of his Adirondack chair is… ... read more
  • Panel Raising
    Having roughed out the back panel, it was time for some beveled edges. I started with the end grain, creating a beveled edge.  1-1/4″ wide tapering from 3/4″ to 1/8″. With both ends complete, the sides were planed in the same manner. With just a bit of tweaking, the panel fit nicely. Too bad this […] ... read more
    Source: An Unplugged WoodworkerPublished on 2019-03-11
  • Columbia University researchers create 3D-printed “wood” with realistic internal grain
    Columbia University researchers create 3D-printed "wood" with realistic internal grain: Rima Sabina Aouf:Engineers at Columbia University have 3D-printed a block of “digital wood”, using a voxel technique that enables the creation of objects with rich internal textures.The resin block is modelled on an olive wood sample, with its exact grain pattern replicated throughout….First, they used destructive tomographic imaging to photograph ultra-fine slices of the wood, cut to just 27 micro-metres (0.027 millimetres) in width by a CNC mill.The stack of ... read more
    Source: Giant CypressPublished on 2019-03-11