• Humanity At Its Best
    50,000 people are fed daily for free in India. It doesn’t matter whether you’re Muslim, Christian, Sikh, Buddhist all are welcome to eat. The whole thing is run through volunteers and it runs 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, year in and year out. They all work in harmony with each other like clock work without pay for humanity’s sake. I don’t know who pays for the food, but there is a lesson in it for all ... read more
    Source: Journeyman’s journalPublished on 2019-01-12
  • How to make a pair of dividers or compasses or both
    Come costruire un compasso o un compasso o entrambiTell me the truth, you've always wanted to build a compass but you were afraid to ask how to do it, that's right?No? Well, it doesn'n matter, here's anyway how you could do it...I stole the idea here.Ditemi la verità, avete sempre desiderato costruirvi un compasso ma non avete mai osato chiedere come fare, giusto?No? Vabeh, non fa niente, ecco comunque come potreste fare...Ho rubato l'idea qui.Take a pencil, a big and long nail ... read more
    Source: L’angolo di spoglia inferiorePublished on 2019-01-11
  • And the Winner Is…
    #118, #118, #118!!!I am always fascinated that people share my fascinations. I thank everybody for reading and responding. I'll do this again in the future. I hope to hold your attention. Thank you.#118 had 5 shots inside. There were a few others that had 4.Now, to go pick up a customs form because this plane is going to the Netherlands ... read more
    Source: Musings from Big PinkPublished on 2019-01-11
  • George and Maturing Men
    George leaned over the bench to get my attention, jerking his head to one side and slightly back to make sure `i understood. It’s brew time, he said. The clocking in clock was wrong and I was behind time. In one minute there would be a cry from the men and I would be given […] Read the full post George and Maturing Men on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2019-01-11
  • Bench-top Bungee Lathe
    FINALLY!  I have lathe capability!!In October of 2017, I experimented with a bow lathe but had less-than-spectacular results.  (Read: it sucked!)  For a long time I've been thinking about how I might build a small, bench top, foot-powered lathe, since I don't have space for a free-standing one.  After scouring the 'net I found something on Lumberjocks that made sense for my bench and space.  It seems to be working well and is small enough that I can put it ... read more
    Source: Woodworking in a tiny shopPublished on 2019-01-11
  • Things That Make my Heart Stop
    This week we received a beautiful batch of photos for Christopher Williams’s upcoming book “The Life & Work of John Brown.” When I reviewed the final photo, my heart skipped a beat or two. It’s a picture of Chris’s chairs headed up by the last chair John Brown reportedly made in 2002 This photo shows the whole history of the relationship between Chris and John Brown, in wood, form and finish. When you read the book, you’ll understand the entire ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2019-01-10
  • A Lego plea
    Another rare guest post on my blog. Daniel owes us an update on the wildlife camera, which he swears he’ll do soon. Meanwhile, he & Rose have this to tell you about: We were waiting to turn 13 so we could enter a product idea to Lego Ideas; a website where you can post a Lego project that you made and that you would want to become an actual Lego set. After you post a product idea, you have 60 ... read more
    Source: Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notesPublished on 2019-01-09
  • Mike Dunbar – Chairmaker
    Mike sent me this email to inform you of his new channel. Here is what he wrote. My name is Mike Dunbar and I am suggesting a blog topic that I believe will interest your readers.  I made Windsor chairs for 45 years. Beginning in 1980 I taught Windsor chairmaking around the United States and Canada. In 1994 my wife Susanna and I gave the craft a permanent home when we opened a school named The Windsor Institute.  Our program ... read more
    Source: Journeyman’s journalPublished on 2019-01-09
  • Sorting Things Out
    It’s been approximately six years since I started woodworking. Once and for all, I’ve grown out of the nylon tool tote I bought from Rings End all those years ago. So it’s time for a DIY toolbox. It goes without saying, but any tool storage container should be sized to fit the tools it’s meant […] ... read more
    Source: The apartment woodworkerPublished on 2019-01-09
  • 3 grits to go…….
    I got the 3 tools I'm rehabbing done up to 120 grit. I have 150, 180, and 220 left to go on the runway. I do the 320, 400, and 600 by hand. Inbetween the runway and the hand sanding I will prime and paint the three. The painting  I can do before or after I chop the mortises. Getting to chopping them ASAP would behoove me.paid these a visit this morning at 0330I couldn't sleep and I don't like ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2019-01-09
  • I wrote this a month ago, amid the tortuous delirium that is the holiday season.Compiling images from the prior month or so before thatso here it is, entirely unfinished, no snazzy intro, we're just gonna jump in 'cause it ain't gonna get posted otherwise(nothing here, just a breath before the onslaught)-the big curves had to be at least close, as the groove would conceal all but the most egregious of disparityusing a combination of rip saw, hatchet, slick and spokeshave ... read more
    Source: Grain DamagedPublished on 2019-01-09
  • Wisdom from Pine Mountain
    “I’ve heard that all my life, a chairmaker never has a thing to set on.” — Chester Cornett, as quoted in “Craftsman of the Cumberlands” (University of Kentucky Press) by Michael Owen Jones ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2019-01-09
  • Imagining what Gibbons intended
    During my most excellent Grinling Gibbons tour a few years ago, I spent a long time staring at one particular carving in the Victoria and Albert museum, the Cassiobury Park overdoor. That carving is one of a set of carvings that decorated many rooms of the Cassiobury Park manor house in the late 1600s. photo: Bob EastonThe cartouche in the center of the cresting piece has been the focus of my imagination for some time. That is, I imagine, perhaps ... read more
    Source: Bob EastonPublished on 2019-01-09
  • Imagining what Gibbons intended
    During my most excellent Grinling Gibbons tour a few years ago, I spent a long time staring at one particular carving in the Victoria and Albert museum, the Cassiobury Park overdoor. That carving is one of a set of carvings that decorated many rooms of the Cassiobury Park manor house in the late 1600s. photo: Bob EastonThe cartouche in the center of the cresting piece has been the focus of my imagination for some time. That is, I imagine, perhaps ... read more
    Source: Bob EastonPublished on 2019-01-09
  • Choosing, Setting up and Using a Bandsaw
    Choosing your bandsaw In times past, a decade or two before I apprenticed in the 1960s, the only bandsaws really available in the UK at any rate were those developed for industry. In some countries bandsaws are still the rarity and scarcity, not the norm at all. We shouldn’t assume that all peoples have access […] Read the full post Choosing, Setting up and Using a Bandsaw on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2019-01-08