• Misconceptions About Signatures
    During the last four months I’ve had some odd encounters with customers at shows, classes and the like. Customer (holding a book): “I understand that you aren’t signing books anymore. But would you mind signing this one book for me?” Me: “Huh? What? I’ll sign anything. Got a baby?” I am happy to sign anything and with anyone’s name (I do a passable “Roy Underhill” and a crappy “Norm Abram”) on your books, DVDs, T-shirts and bare flesh when you... read more
    Source: Lost Art Press | Published on 2014-04-23
  • This Week in My Forge
    Finally the weather is getting nice so I've been able to get back into my forge for some tinkering around. The first project I made was a trivet. This was a lot harder than I thought it would be, but I am happy with the results. Getting the circle shaped is harder than it looks, but by trial and error I got the circle close enough to round. This made me really want to get a blacksmith cone. The other fun thing... read more
    Source: Frontier Carpenter | Published on 2014-04-23
  • This Week in My Forge
    Finally the weather is getting nice so I've been able to get back into my forge for some tinkering around. The first project I made was a trivet. This was a lot harder than I thought it would be, but I am happy with the results. Getting the circle shaped is harder than it looks, but by trial and error I got the circle close enough to round. This made me really want to get a blacksmith cone. The other fun thing... read more
    Source: Frontier Carpenter | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Allergic To Work
    When you wake up in the fire wood pile with a nose bleed you know that something is going to have to give. I’d been having migraines for a little while which was odd as headaches are not something I’ve ever suffered with, and I’m rubbish at putting up with it. I’m not one to moan about feeling ill though and I’m very well looked after (Helen feeds me like a king!), my job keeps me active and when I think... read more
    Source: The English Woodworker | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Some Roorkee Details to Ponder
    Ghurka – the maker of fine leather goods – offers a couple of different Roorkee patterns for sale at its website: the officer’s lounger and the officer’s chair. Both are made in the classic style in oak with nice leather details. What caught my eye were a couple of construction details. One that I like, and one that makes me say “Hmmmm.” The one I like is the way they attach the arm straps to the back of the legs.... read more
    Source: Lost Art Press | Published on 2014-04-23
  • First Craftsy Post: Woodworking Safety Tips
    Have a look at my first post on the Craftsy woodworking blog:  http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2014/04/woodworking-safety-tips/ The great Wilbur Pan, of Giant Cypress fame, is also on board. I think some cool woodworking things are coming up at Craftsy, so stay tuned.... read more
    Source: Furnitude | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Diamond Willow Roorkee – Part IV: Dad’s Experience
    Brian and Phil with the finished chair Phil   Look at the above picture & you'll see  that  Brian has solved problem of where to drill the holes on crooked sticks with the diamond indentations and perfect fitting of the braces - and then  centered holes  and which stick went where - his explanations left me saying uh-huh  quite a  bit--  I call  the finished  chair   BRIANS CHAIR as I was the assistant and the confused helper--however I may get  some... read more
    Source: Toolerable | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Kanna help you, perhaps? (II)
    鉋 Kanna: n. A Japanese hand plane - the greatest tool ever invented for slicing wood to the finest imaginable levels, capable producing glassy polished surfaces with nary a tool mark. Many nuances is set up and tuning, yet comprised of only a wooden block, a couple of blades, and a metal pin.The Sino-Japanese character for plane, kanna, '鉋', when broken into its two constituent elements of '金' (metal) and '包' (envelop, wrap), has the literal meaning of the metal... read more
    Source: The Carpentry Way | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Hi Wilbur, I’ve got a couple of questions for you. If you had a 67-68 mm wide blade and you wa...
    1. I’d widen the opening of the dai. That’s going to be a lot easier than grinding off a total of 2-3mm off the sides of the blade. 2. I have three mortise chisels: 6mm, 7.5mm, and 24mm. The smaller two have covered all the mortising jobs I’ve needed to do in furniture scale mortise and tenons up to this point. The larger one I bought to make the mortises for my workbench. I doubt that I will ever use... read more
    Source: Giant Cypress | Published on 2014-04-23
  • A little sample
    The Lost Art Press blog featured a sample of the book yesterday. If you didn't see it already, check it out!We are almost ready for filming Rough Cut tomorrow. Perhaps the best thing to come of it is that we had a great excuse to clean out the shop! I haven't seen it this clear in years. I am finishing the prototype for the set of chairs that I'm reproducing. It came out darn close to what I wanted, but... read more
    Source: Chair Notes | Published on 2014-04-23
  • ten rules for students and teachers
    These 10 rules for students and teachers was written by Sister Corita Kent in 1968 and popularized by composer Nickolas Cage. If you are a human being and not a machine, you will know that you are both student and teacher rolled into one body, and these rules would work for you, too. RULE ONE: Find a place you trust, and then try trusting it for a while. RULE TWO: General duties of a student: Pull everything out of your... read more
    Source: Wisdom of the Hands | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Ups and Downs With Plane Irons – A Working Video Perspective
    There have been many questions surrounding bevel ups and bevel downs for a decade and more. My experience tells me many things different than I read elsewhere and it’s on my experience I rely the most. My recent blog post on this subject has revealed some controversial issues surrounding the modern-day woodworker looking for answers in pursuit of real woodworking. When you can’t make your plane work well, woodworkers have difficulty knowing whether buying new might be the solution. In reality, for the... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ Blog | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Six Days in May
      Well here we are, almost the end of April and with that, about three weeks before I head to Rosewood Studio, in Perth, Ontario. If you haven’t heard, I’ll be there teaching a six-day course I’ve titled,  “It Starts with a Box“, beginning on... Related Posts 38 days, or was it 38 ways ? a winterlude in the days of september… my other bad axes It Starts with a Box upcoming woodworking classes... read more
    Source: The Unplugged Woodshop | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Automation and Carpel Tunnel Syndrome
    In the good old days grinders would sit for 8-10 hours a day straddling a 4 foot diameter solid sandstone grinding wheel spinning at a surface speed of about 60 miles per hour. While wheel explosions were rare, early death from silicosis wasn't. It was a known occupational hazard, but in return for pretty good wages a grinder ran a known risk of early death, and at the very least some respiratory problems. Fortunately for the edge tool industry, most... read more
    Source: Joel’s Blog at Tools for Working Wood | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Automation and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
    In the good old days grinders would sit for 8-10 hours a day straddling a 4 foot diameter solid sandstone grinding wheel spinning at a surface speed of about 60 miles per hour. While wheel explosions were rare, early death from silicosis wasn't. It was a known occupational hazard, but in return for pretty good wages a grinder ran a known risk of early death, and at the very least some respiratory problems. Fortunately for the edge tool industry, most... read more
    Source: Joel’s Blog at Tools for Working Wood | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Tumblehome sea chest
    During the building of the small fairy tale bed, I found myself dreaming of making something real again. I know that a doll bed is for real, but somehow I found myself constantly drawing small tumblehome sea chests on every scrap piece of paper lying around.The other day we received some stainless steel tubes that came strapped to a nice wide board, so suddenly I had 18' of a 6" x 1" spruce board at my hands..The board was transformed... read more
    Source: Mulesaw: Being old fashioned, the cool way. | Published on 2014-04-23
  • side braces cooking…….
    The only thing I accomplished in the shop tonight was cooking the side braces. I got the last clamp on around 5PM, which is the time I try to never work past on a weekday. This handtool thing is very relaxing not to mention it's a whole quieter then my electron munching machines.  I can't think of better to unwind from the hospital than the hour or so I get in the shop after work. I didn't forget I didn't... read more
    Source: Accidental Woodworker | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Moulding Planes and Associated Things….
    Hi Folks Been pretty crazy here at the Philly Planes Workshop - we took delivery of a trees worth of quarter sawn Beech last week! There are planks of it everywhere and I've spent hours breaking it down into plane sized billets. Every nook and cranny of the 'shop has blocks of Beech  pushed into it!Why have I bought so much? It is extremely difficult to find quartered stock (which is vital for wooden planes as it means the stock... read more
    Source: Philsville | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Tools for curves team
    As I said, I’ll use whatever tool it takes to get the desired result for a particular curve in a particular wood. So let’s take a look at the available players and which make the cut (pun intended). Most of the game is won or lost on concave (inside) curves; the outside curves are easy. Spokeshaves perform well on relatively narrow work with cooperative grain, but they can disappoint on highly figured woods, even using a skewed attack. The round... read more
    Source: Heartwood Blog | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Cherry Trestle Table Making Progress
    This table is almost completed but here are some shots from a week or so ago.  I like to have a breadboard end on my Trestle Tables but they are a lot of work to make. The full width tenon is a job to do.  The table which is quite heavy must be flipped over and back countless times in order to properly fit the breadboard end.  The "end" before trimming to size.  The extra length makes it easier to... read more
    Source: What’s New at TimothyClark.com | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Diamond Willow Roorkee – Part III: Complete
    Completed chair The chair is done.  I told Dad it would be a two-day project we could do during my vacation at home.  It turned out to take a total of six days.Well, some things are more important.  We put in two good days of work on the chair, and the next few days we snuck in time when when we could.  This morning, Dad pounded the rivets on the back, and we were done by 9:30 or so.In the... read more
    Source: Toolerable | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Full-size Leather Lips for Your Stool
    The leather “lips” for the seat on the stool in “Campaign Furniture” have stymied a few readers. Their exact shape isn’t critical, but I should have provided a gridded diagram to make things easier. Reader Glenn Frazee has made it super-easy to cut out your leather lips. He generated the following full-size pattern in pdf format for you to download. Simply print it out (with no scaling) and use it to make a wooden template for your lips. folding_camp_stool_lips_cutting_pattern Thanks... read more
    Source: Lost Art Press | Published on 2014-04-23
  • Designing Exceptional Furniture
    If you want to understand how to balance form, texture and colour to absolute perfection, study the work of Irish designer maker John Lee.The difference between good furniture and truly exquisite furniture is the way that these three factors work together. In the example above, the oval form of the table and the highly detailed carved texture on the outer surfaces are very strong. To balance the strength of these two elements, he has bleached the colour out of the... read more
    Source: Matthew’s Blog at Workshop Heaven | Published on 2014-04-22
  • When to Fix and When to Burn?
    I was turning another file handle on my pole lathe on Sunday when I discovered a worm hole that only got bigger the more I turned away. Check out this short video to see what I mean: Apr 20, 2014 | Amazing appearing wormholes. Dangit! by RenaissanceWW on Keek.com Over the subsequent few days since I posted that Keek, I have gotten no fewer than 50 emails telling me I’m crazy for giving up and pitching that piece of Cherry.... read more
    Source: Renaissance Woodworker Blog | Published on 2014-04-22
  • Drips
    Richard As the lunchtime rain drips from the lathe handle, I wonder. Not much use for the hob nails in the treadle this mild Winter passed.   I wonder when the felled beech tree that forms one leg supporting the lathe bed will become so rotten  that it no longer will support the lathe. The other end which lives indoors under the tarp still looks pretty solid. The lathe looks and works pretty well. Wonder when that lady is coming to... read more
    Source: Flying Shavings | Published on 2014-04-22
  • Carving without a plan
    Sometimes it's good to grab some scrap wood and just whittle away. Here I took an irregular chunk of scrap, and wound up with five faces (two on one side, three on the other.)... read more
    Source: Wonderful Whittlin’ | Published on 2014-04-22
  • Bench Dog Kits to Complete your Bench
    A good workbench is a necessity for working with hand tools and dogs make it easy to keep your workpiece from moving around on the bench. To take advantage of our 3/4″ Wooden Bench Dogs, you simply have to use a 3/4″ diameter bit in your drill and bore holes spaced at regular intervals, or wherever a dog might be useful, right? Not so fast. When I drilled the holes in my bench, I found out that the seemingly-simple task... read more
    Source: Time Warp Tool Works | Published on 2014-04-22
  • Peter Galbert on Practicing Mistakes
    Editor’s note: Peter Galbert’s upcoming book on chairmaking is filled with stuff I have already begun to put into practice in my shop. Check out this short passage. While learning techniques for turning specific details is important, I’ve found that having a process to practice and improve them is critical to mastering them. I remember learning to turn and feeling like mistakes and catches came out of nowhere, like a mugger in the night. But turning is simple physics, and... read more
    Source: Lost Art Press | Published on 2014-04-22
  • I have 4 spinning wheels in my shop right now!
    With a couple in the queue, so I need to get busy.  Here is one I just recently completed, a kit wheel, very well made in the style of the 1850′s.  It was in need of lubrication, a tune up and a new drive band.  The customer also ordered 5 additional bobbins for hours of uninterrupted spinning. The bobbins are made of cherry, glued together with hide glue and finished with Moses T’s Gunstocker’s Finish.  The weather has turned nice... read more
    Source: Full Chisel | Published on 2014-04-22
  • Hell’s Teeth!
    Having past my 60th birthday a couple of years ago, I'm delighted and just ever-so-slightly bowled over to have been headhunted.   There can't be many folk who've started their retirement and then find that totally new career path opens up in front of them. More details to follow. ... read more
    Source: The Blokeblog | Published on 2014-04-22