• Lance Mannion and River View
    Several days ago Lance Mannion posted this: "Felt my mortality weighing heavily on me this morning. Tried to keep the demons at bay by telling myself I could be around for another 30 years.  The demons laughed. What's the point of that? they asked mockingly. I had to grant them the point.Thirty more years? Might be a pleasanter prospect if I and nobody I knew were going to age and things would continue on pretty much the way they are. ... read more
    Source: I’M A OK GUYPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Watching TV…
    One reason that you might be reading my blog is that you like making stuff- it’s always interesting to see what other craftspeople do and to know that it’s just not you who’s mad! There seems to be a plethora of reality TV shows where various stuff from cakes to rat rods are made. Many of them show the main protagonists getting frustrated and swearing a lot; presumably this is what has been deemed necessary to attract viewers! And there ... read more
    Source: A Luthier’s BlogPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Against Perfection, Precision or Accuracy
    It’s difficult to argue against perfection in woodworking. That’s because the counter argument is something like: “You’re a hack and can’t get it right, and so you say that your imperfections are intentional.” Or put another way, you can’t be too rich, too thin or have joinery that is too perfect. Here’s how I think about perfection: We now have the technology to abolish time zones. Each person’s phone could […] The post Against Perfection, Precision or Accuracy appeared first ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Octagonal Tables/Continuous Arm Class
    My new DVD is out!  I love building these little tables – they have many of the fun aspects of building a chair, but they can be made in a weekend.  Well, maybe two weekends, a month apart.  Here’s a tour of my shop that the crew filmed while they were here: Due do the demand, I have added a new Continuous Arm class, March 19-24th, 2018. More info on my teaching page.   ... read more
    Source: Elia BizzarriPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Live and Learn
    Making Things Work Some people have the vague notion that when you’ve been a woodworker for decades, you know how to do everything. If only. No one knows how to do everything. Experience in a variety of techniques may be transferable to new forms, but just because a technique will work does not mean it’s especially good in structural or aesthetic terms, let alone efficient to use in specific circumstances. When faced with a woodworking mystery–say, a look I ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Filing is boring
    Today I toothed two 22" saw blades. 9 tpi and 7 tpi. File consuming and boring.  After that I needed to finish a project. So I changed the blade of a old J.T. & S. Bowden dovetail saw.  ... read more
    Source: Old LadiesPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Filing is boring
    Today I toothed two 22" saw blades. 9 tpi and 7 tpi. File consuming and boring.  After that I needed to finish a project. So I changed the blade of a old J.T. & S. Bowden dovetail saw.  ... read more
    Source: Old LadiesPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Two-Cherry Picking
    What’s saddest of all is what I said about new woodworkers picking up the saw. There is something thats true about all of us when we start any creative craft. We tend to think buying something less expensive will match our amateur-status skill level and that “it will do until we find out of we … Read the full post Two-Cherry Picking on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2017-06-25
  • made a new tool…….
    I am not someone who revels in making their own tools. I would much rather buy a tool I need but sometimes you don't have that choice. Especially so when you are in the middle of building something and you are dead in the water because of a lack of a specific tool. I came close to that today but in my case I made a tool to replace a manufactured one. It wasn't planned and it was driven strictly ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Stacked Veneer Experiment with a Shocking Lesson
    You’re probably aware that I like to incorporate a twist in my designs. For some time, I’ve had this idea to laminate a stack of veneer in a twisted manner, so each subsequent piece of veneer is rotated just a degree or two. I suspected that, due to the difference in appearance between long grain and end grain, I would see a gradual lightness/darkness shift along the surface. To test my theory and see what it would really look like, ... read more
    Source: Flair WoodworksPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Picture This CX
    Whether by the hand of its maker, a natural defect or the passage of time having its effect on highly contorted wood, antique furniture can be the more beautiful and desirable for its often-perceived shortcomings and faults. Like a face-pulling … Continue reading ... read more
    Source: Pegs and ‘TailsPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Waxing Lyrical
    Winters in Australia aren’t nearly as severe as winters back in Ireland and England, but the recent daytime highs of 12° to 16° (54°F to 61°F) provide near optimal conditions for waxing furniture. Of course, waxing can be undertaken at … Continue reading ... read more
    Source: Pegs and ‘TailsPublished on 2017-06-25
  • Don’t let this happen to you
    Many of us woodworkers have a habit of casting our judgmental eyes on woodwork we encounter anywhere, at anytime. Imagine if we were hair stylists. Recently, I noticed the condition of the tables in a certain non-chain pizza shop, which happens to serve the best pizza I have ever tasted. Great pizza joint, bad edge […] ... read more
    Source: Heartwood BlogPublished on 2017-06-24
  • Today
    Today I realy wanted to make a lot of work on the saws of the backlog. I just have put all the tools from the Austria trip back in place, when my daughter came to the workshop, phone in the hand.A friend asked if we would like to join them on a sailing trip watching the Windjammerparade* at the end of the Kieler Woche*.Living in Kiel for 22 years, I've somehow managed never to have sailed here.So no pics of ... read more
    Source: Old LadiesPublished on 2017-06-24
  • Today
    Today I realy wanted to make a lot of work on the saws of the backlog. I just have put all the tools from the Austria trip back in place, when my daughter came to the workshop, phone in the hand.A friend asked if we would like to join them on a sailing trip watching the Windjammerparade* at the end of the Kieler Woche*.Living in Kiel for 22 years, I've somehow managed never to have sailed here.So no pics of ... read more
    Source: Old LadiesPublished on 2017-06-24
  • The Sad Tale of Tom Turkey
    Making Things Work Warning: The following is not about woodworking, so if you wish to limit your reading to that subject, you may prefer to substitute an installment of Routers I Have Loved (my personal favorite was my 1980 Elu) or wait for Chris’s next post about Roman Workbenches (which I am, in all seriousness, eagerly anticipating). This anecdote was excised from Making Things Work on the grounds that too much of a good thing is, well, sometimes too ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-06-24
  • Quick Carving Tip!
    Carvings have absolutely nothing to do with the structural integrity of the chair, but they do stand out as the most visually "loud" elements. As such, I am always very sensitive to the role of the carvings because they give a distinct impression of the quality of the rest of the piece.  Here is just one part that I find adds a great deal of interest and beauty to a volute on a comb back ear.I alway think about a ... read more
    Source: Chair NotesPublished on 2017-06-24
  • The Case Against Tail Vises
    If workbenches were like automobiles, then I’d consider the tail vise to be like the heated seats in a car. They’re an option, of course, but they are by no means standard equipment, like tires. Out of economic necessity, my first three workbenches didn’t have tail vises, and so I was thrilled when I was assigned to review a full-size European workbench with all the bells and whistles, including a […] The post The Case Against Tail Vises appeared first ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2017-06-24
  • Pointing toward perfection
    If you’re looking to read a few excellent thoughts about perfection this month I’d like to point you here. ... read more
    Source: The Daily SkepPublished on 2017-06-24
  • a different miter practice…..
    Today was hot and humid. Both of these happening together make me a miserable SOB to be around if I'm not in an AC space. As I am typing up this blog post, the skies are turning gray because there is supposed to be a line of thunder boomers rolling through. And those are forecasted to last into tomorrow morning. After the wet stuff leaves, the H&H is coming back. Sunday is going to be toasty with a predicted temp ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-06-24
  • Shame On You Two Cherries, Shame On YOU!
    This week I picked up a brand new gent’s saw straight from the pack made by the famous German tool makers Two Cherries. I noticed the unusual tooth shape, which strangely resembled the edge of a tin can when we used to open it with a multipurpose survival knife. I wondered how it would work … Read the full post Shame On You Two Cherries, Shame On YOU! on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2017-06-24
  • First Church of Christ, Cabinetmaker
    For some time now, I’ve had a silly little fantasy. I’d start my own church: the First Church of Christ, Cabinetmaker. We’d meet on Saturday afternoons and glory in the making of things. From the crotchety handtoolers to the hipster CNC’rs, and everyone in between, all would be welcome.  The Jesus part would be optional, […] ... read more
    Source: The apartment woodworkerPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Thoughts About Selling Dulcimers That Don’t Exist
    I have decided to take a break from taking advance orders for custom dulcimers. Five years ago about half my dulcimers were sold before I made them. Someone would choose from various options I offer and give me a deposit to begin making their dulcimer. I prioritized these custom orders and built them in the order they were received. While building these custom dulcimers I also had time to build dulcimers that were not already sold. I usually had ... read more
    Source: Doug BerchPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Little Wooden Boxes
    Ink well, New Kingdom, Egypt. H-4.5 cm x L-12.2 cm x D-5.6 cm (1-3/4″ x 4-13/16″ x 2-3/16″). British Museum. I like to study the everday objects on display in museums and my favorites are the small boxes and containers used to hold all manner of things: keepsakes, love letters, poison, cosmetics and so on. In ancient Egypt many of the little boxes recovered from tombs were used to hold various cosmetic pastes used by women and men (aka guyliner). ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Block plane depth-adjustment mechanisms (iv) – weird mechanisms
    There were some interesting mechanisms devised for depth adjustment. Those that stand out were designed by Leonard Bailey. The first of these, Patent No. 189,415 is for a very sleek looking mechanism with a milled thumbwheel which attaches to a vertical substructure of the plane body via a plate. Underneath the wheel there is a pinion (G), which turns with the thumbwheel and gears into another wheel (H), which has a cam-slot (J). Within the cam slot there is a ... read more
    Source: Working by handPublished on 2017-06-23
  • STL 140: The one with epic smooth moves
    With Ben filling in for Tom, and Anissa Kapsales filling in for Matt, the group confesses smooth moves, discusses mortising options, intermediate projects, router tables, flattening cupped boards, and woodworking revelations. Plus, Mike is accused of being a bit cheeky with this all-time favorite technique. ... read more
  • A Coffee Tragedy: Turning a Lid
    This article first appeared in the December 2013 issue of The Highland Woodturner. There was an accident involving a ceramic coffee container, which was a gift from my in-laws. More specifically, I accidentally dropped and shattered the lid of the container. After pondering this tragic accident, I realized I could turn a replacement lid. CLICK HERE to read Curtis’s lid-turning process CLICK HERE to take a look at the Highland Woodturner Archives The post A Coffee Tragedy: Turning a Lid ... read more
    Source: Highland Woodworking BlogPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Tool Confusion Disorder
    Also known as TCD is a compulsive disorder characterized by an obsession with tools and often includes symptoms as delusions, neurotic behavior and irrational thought. It causes great distress experienced by patients in an attempt to fulfill their desires. Some specialist have described it as a compulsive hoarding disorder but recent studies have shown that it is […] ... read more
    Source: Fabula LignariusPublished on 2017-06-23
  • The Beginner Workbench
    Construction Lumber and Just a Few Tools What is the best beginner workbench? Wow, that’s a loaded question! Its one I get all the time. Usually I tell beginning woodworkers to hold off on building a bench right away because they don’t know what they don’t know yet and a workbench isn’t actually needed to get started. For example, I’ve built a few things in the garage of my in law’s place in Maine using a sawhorse and ... read more
    Source: Renaissance Woodworker BlogPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Ray Iles iron follow up…….
    I got asked a few questions about the Ray Iles replacement Iron I got for my Stanley 5 1/2. I briefly went over it in yesterday's blog and today I'll try to address what I was asked and what I think I should add.First off I would buy another of these in a heart beat even though I only have one days worth of experience with them. I've got other replacement Stanley irons, one from Hock and another from tools from ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-06-23