• Sam Understands V-tools
    As I was watching my buddy, Sam, poke his head into the kitchen through the cat door as he often does, I got to thinking about v-tools.  Sam’s problem is also the problem of many v-tools: his bottom is too wide.  In Sam’s case, too wide to follow his head through the cat door; in the case of a v-tool, too wide to follow the cutting edge deep into the groove. From the workshop, the problem is clear. Unless ... read more
    Source: David Fisher, Carving ExplorationsPublished on 2017-09-22
  • How do you judge a dovetail saw?
    For such a personal tool, more than one person is necessary ... read more
  • Dugout Chair Part 7, The Bark Flies
    Before I could strip the bark off the dugout chair, I needed to shape the chair’s back. The bark had all my layout marks indicating the final shape of the chair. Armed with the TurboPlane, I smoothed out the steps I had cut into the stump earlier with my chainsaw. When I shaped the chair with a chainsaw, I sawed kerfs up and down the back of the chair that […] The post Dugout Chair Part 7, The Bark Flies ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2017-09-21
  • The Hand, the Hound, or the Truth?
    George and I often get asked which book should be read first and we don’t have a quick answer. Since our research has been a long-time quest, we didn’t write them necessarily in the order a beginner should take them up. We both agree, though, that our most recent “From Truth to Tools” would probably be the one we’d suggest reading first. It will go a long way to help you visualize space with practical knowledge about how our tools ... read more
    Source: BH&EPublished on 2017-09-21
  • Krenov sawhorses
    Recently I decided to make a new pair of sawhorses to replace the traditional ones I made years ago.  I wanted them to be suitable for use with handsaws as I don't find sawbenches to be satisfactory.  I just don't find the position comfortable or conducive to accurate sawing and the old sawhorses are too high and long to use for handsawing in my shop.As I often do, I started by searching for online images and was immediately attracted to ... read more
    Source: Oregon Woodworker by Andy MargesonPublished on 2017-09-21
  • Making a handle for a pocket knife 2
    I shaped the handle using a round and a half round file to get close to the shape that I wanted.Before sanding I needed to drill the recessed holes for the heads of the screws.I ground a drill like a router bit and mounted in our drill press. I had marked out where it should go and then I drilled very carefully. The first result was perfect. But in the other side f the knife, a small chip broke off, ... read more
    Source: Mulesaw: Being old fashioned, the cool way.Published on 2017-09-21
  • Other Anarchist Designers
    When I wrote “The Anarchist’s Design Book” during a five-year period, my hope was that my explanations of staked and boarded furniture forms would inspire other woodworkers to take up the tools and produce their own variations. Lots of woodworkers have built the staked sawbench, backstool, chair and worktable. And, in the boarded category, I’ve seen a lot of bookcases, tool chests and six-board chests during the last two years. My favorite response to the book, however, has been ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2017-09-21
  • Festool Heaven: Which Festool Should You Buy First?
    For this month’s issue of Festool Heaven, we asked Steve Johnson which Festool he would recommend for a friend if they had never owned a Festool product before. He said the question sounded strange at first, but after thinking about it awhile, he came up with a surprising answer. Click here to read Steve’s recommendation The post Festool Heaven: Which Festool Should You Buy First? appeared first on Woodworking Blog. ... read more
    Source: Highland Woodworking BlogPublished on 2017-09-21
  • September spoons for sale
          I’ll be updating my workshop-teaching schedule soon with some Plymouth CRAFT classes and looking toward next year (we’ve started planning Greenwood Fest already!) In the meantime, I have a few spoons (and one bowl) for sale this time – if you’d like one, just leave a comment and we can take it from there; paypal or check is fine either way. Woods this time are birch, cherry & walnut. All carved with hatchet, knife and hook knife. ... read more
    Source: Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notesPublished on 2017-09-21
  • Slow eyes
    Sometimes I have to remind myself to have slow eyes. Instead of throwing a cursory glance over the parts of my projects to determine “good enough” I try to be vigilant about going back and seeing the details. Surface tear-out or a facet out of plane can make all the difference in the final stages of a project, but I have a tendency to rush those moments. Part of the reason I take pictures of things is that photography helps ... read more
    Source: The Daily SkepPublished on 2017-09-21
  • shipping box done….
    Over the past few weeks I've been reading what I can about the art of hammering kinks out of saw plates. I am sending one out to be done and I have two unkinked beater saws that will become scraper stock. I am thinking of trying to kink them first so I can practice on them. From what I have seen and read, it doesn't appear to be rocket science requiring a PhD to do. I can probably with practice ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-09-21
  • M&T Shop Building: Raising the Frame Day Three
    Today began with finishing the bird's mouths for the rafters to seat into. Because the original roof system was damaged in a fire, Luke salvaged materials from other Vermont frames that weren’t going to be restored. Because the replacement ridge mortise layout was different than the original, the plates needed to be cut to match the ridge. While Mike and I cut the bird’s mouths, the rest of the team made preparations for the plates’ raising including installing a ... read more
    Source: Mortise & tenon magazinePublished on 2017-09-21
  • Correct Hide Glue Ratio Mix
    I see innumerable recordings on YouTube innocently giving out the wrong information on the ratio mix of water to granules.  Why are there so many mislead? My own particular musings to this is were all gaining from each other. In the event that one source puts out deluding data, at that point it spreads like an infection tainting thousands consistently. My issue with some YouTube recordings is the mundane, relentless, unconcerned, easygoing, detached demeanor they take towards the art. For ... read more
    Source: Journeyman’s journalPublished on 2017-09-21
  • Making rust
    Rust is ubiquitous. So about six weeks ago, I submerged a steel plane blade into a jar of tap water, about half way up the blade. I then sealed the jar loosely. The idea is to see how rust forms on the blade – both the submerged and exposed halves. The blade was rust free to begin with. This follows on from some experiments I ran a few years ago. Blade in the water. The rust that formed on the ... read more
    Source: Working by handPublished on 2017-09-21
  • Charpoy-Part 2
    I spent the last few days completing the remaining tenons on the long rails.  Nothing fancy.  Just a lot of rip and crosscuts.  After a little judicious pairing I had those tenons fitted and the charpoy frame dry-fit together. The rails were far too angular in their current state.  Eventually the webbing and anchor cord will wrap around the rails, rounded corners will be much easier on those materials.  The decision at hand was what did I want the ... read more
    Source: GREG MERRITT – BY MY OWN HANDSPublished on 2017-09-21
  • For sale
    Six months ago, I saw this extraordinary piece of apple wood, this ring, and I knew I wanted to carve around its rim the inscription from the Ring of Power from the Lord of the Rings: “One ring to rule them all, one ring to find them, One ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.” It was fun, but it’s not my main and most serious purpose. I’d like to sell it to continue to ... read more
    Source: Endangered alphabetsPublished on 2017-09-20
  • Making a handle for a pocket knife
    As Brian Eve once noticed, whenever I am at home, my blog is pretty much dead. I don't do it on purpose, it just happens. I like to all sorts of things but to sit in front of a computer.My family have given me a smart phone and I have accepted it, because they claimed that I could use it to take pictures with, and these would be instantly accessible on my blog.Now it seems as though it is not ... read more
    Source: Mulesaw: Being old fashioned, the cool way.Published on 2017-09-20
  • Two Classes Left This Year
    On Friday the doors open to the second to the last class of the year. It will be the first day of Autumn and it seems to have started right on cue. Tomorrow I will arrange the benches and the tools and all the wood is cut and ready. The students are coming from Sweden, … Read the full post Two Classes Left This Year on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2017-09-20
  • Slab on the slab
    A break from bowls today. Carved and painted sign on oak slab. Part of one of the boards from the Huxham's cross tree, destined for somewhere along the Dartmouth road. ... read more
    Source: Rivers JoineryPublished on 2017-09-20
  • Dugout Chair Part 6, Remove the Rot
    My progress on the dugout chair has been stymied by rains from two hurricanes, building two Campaign bookshelves and laying out a forthcoming book on carving by Mary May. But today I fired up my angle grinder to remove the rotted interior of this silver maple. I don’t have a ton of experience with an angle grinder. But if you’ve used an electric router, then you’ll quickly get comfortable with […] The post Dugout Chair Part 6, Remove the Rot ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2017-09-20
  • It’s all about planning
    I’m fitting a Headway transducer to Brendan’s new mandolin and this changes the order of the way that I put things together. I have to start work on the tailpiece much sooner than I usually do.Then the soundboard is fitted and glued to the rim (normally I glue the back first) and the area around the end graft is cleaned up. Then the brass base of the tailpiece is fitted to the rim, I only use two screws as the jacket ... read more
    Source: A Luthier’s BlogPublished on 2017-09-20
  • SketchUp Tip: Where’s the Tipping Point
    One of the many benefits of using SketchUp in the design of your projects is the ability to get all sorts of useful information out of it automatically. You can… ... read more
  • Ten Ways I am Doing Things Differently – Part 2
    I've been working with wood since I was a kid. I took my first woodworking class at the 92nd Street Y when I was 6 years old. I've been taking classes and building stuff for over 35 years. For the last 17 I have been working at Tools for Working Wood. In that time, new tools and new techniques have come on the market. By and large I have ignored them in my personal work. However, I haven't ignored everything, ... read more
    Source: Joel’s Blog at Tools for Working WoodPublished on 2017-09-20
  • And yet, it has held.
    Source: The Daily SkepPublished on 2017-09-20
  • Regulator Clock – Egg and Dart Moulding
    Gratitude: being able to eat dessert first. Yes, carving is my dessert, and I’m enjoying it. In fact, going purposefully slow drags out the work for more enjoyment. OK, that’s an easy excuse for being a slow carver. There are now three segments of egg and dart moulding that will be set aside until other parts are done. The side pieces will end up being shortened by about 3 eggs, eggs that I used for “warm up” or practice as ... read more
    Source: Bob EastonPublished on 2017-09-20
  • Regulator Clock – Egg and Dart Moulding
    Gratitude: being able to eat dessert first. Yes, carving is my dessert, and I’m enjoying it. In fact, going purposefully slow drags out the work for more enjoyment. OK, that’s an easy excuse for being a slow carver. There are now three segments of egg and dart moulding that will be set aside until other parts are done. The side pieces will end up being shortened by about 3 eggs, eggs that I used for “warm up” or practice as ... read more
    Source: Bob EastonPublished on 2017-09-20
  • toolbox 99.99% done…….
    I am done with upgrading the toolbox woodworking wise. The last 0.01% left is to paint the dust shield banding I put on. I will also paint the rest of the tool exterior again. After it has been painted I'll put on a couple coats of satin poly. That will make it easier to clean the dust off of it. I'm looking forward to filling it with tools for Miles.done rightThese are the dovetails I expect of myself each and ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2017-09-20
  • BCM 2017: On a New Track (5)
    Last post in a series describing some repair work on 4 sliding paneled doors, or ita-do, and related sliding track, for the Boston Children's Museum.---------------Today was install day, and that meant a 2 hour commute to Boston, one of the least drivable cities on the planet in my experience (not that I have driven in every city on the planet!). I allowed extra time this morning for the drive, which was fortunate, because one of the routes close in to the ... read more
    Source: The Carpentry WayPublished on 2017-09-19
  • M&T Shop Building: Raising the Bents Day Two
      This morning the crew gathered at 7:00 and devised a plan for raising the next three bents. The members between the bents are connected to each other with a 24’ long joist and so it was assembled as a unit and raised into place with a manual lift. The next bent was assembled on horses on the ground and carried into place by Matt via telehandler. This process continued all the way through to the fourth and final bent. ... read more
    Source: Mortise & tenon magazinePublished on 2017-09-19
  • Sketch Your Way to Better Designs
    One of my best woodworking tools is one I don’t write about much: my sketchbook. It’s an inexpensive spiral-bound thing I get at the grocery store, right by the romance novels. It’s always in my bag when I travel, and it’s on my lap when I’m “encouraged” to watch “Project Runway” with my lovely wife. I keep a mechanical pencil clipped to its metal spirals and use it to solve […] The post Sketch Your Way to Better Designs appeared ... read more
    Source: Woodworking Magazine WeblogPublished on 2017-09-19