• three things
    A few things floating around. The first photo is not mine, nor my work. It’s Dave Fisher’s carved sign, made for Jennie Alexander. Finished just before JA’s death, so now what to do with it? I told Dave to keep it – but he had other ideas. Read on. Here’s Dave’s story about this sign: “I carved this sign for Jennie Alexander, author of the seminal book, Make a Chair from a Tree.  Since then, the leaves have fallen and the ... read more
    Source: Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notesPublished on 2018-11-17
  • Sign Auction
    The sign now, with light coming from the upper right. It’s been four months since I wrote a blog post about carving this sign for Jennie Alexander.  Since then, the leaves have fallen and the oiled oak has begun to take on a patina.  Although Jennie was able to see photos of the finished sign, she passed away before she was able to receive it.  After a lot of thought and talking with Jennie’s daughter and others close to ... read more
    Source: David Fisher, Carving ExplorationsPublished on 2018-11-17
  • yeah for the USPS…….
    I made a pit stop at Shaws tonight to get some Cheetos for my wife and the parking lot was packed. I guess I shouldn't have been surprised though, we got 5" of snow yesterday. The parking lot was relatively free of the white stuff though. Not even big piles off to the sides. In spite of the crowded parking lot, Shaws was basically empty. Go figure on that.As I was driving up to my house I saw a couple ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2018-11-17
  • Issue 6 scheduled for release in Dec.
    I’m just finishing another project article and I think you’ll like it. This time I added dovetails just to make it a little more challenging for those still learning. All these projects are not just for beginners, but for all levels of woodworkers. I also have a small refurbishment article on a jewellery box which I think you’ll like too. My personal projects I won’t write about only for the sake of wanting to complete them within a reasonable time ... read more
    Source: Journeyman’s journalPublished on 2018-11-17
  • Record No 05 Jack Plane
    The ubiquitous Jack plane No 5, that and the No 4 were in everyone household at one point.Or so it would seems, because they are everywhere...They shows up in many flavours, most patterned after the Stanley Bailey No 5, this particular one is from Jolly old England, across the pond, the Record No 05At first glance, it look amazingly in good shape, lots of finish, decal almost complete, full length cutter.  Used? Oh, yes, there is an accumulation of wood ... read more
    Source: The Valley WoodworkerPublished on 2018-11-17
  • Australia birds
    I will get to the woodworking. But first… Look – seems like just another instance of people ruining the planet, strewing trash all over, doesn’t it? Fooled you – (some of you, anyway) this is an intentional collection, assembled by a Satin Bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus). I still can’t believe I got to see the Satin Bowerbird at his bower. Thanks to Paul Boyer and Rachel Clarke for hosting me, while I sat in the blind they made so I ... read more
    Source: Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notesPublished on 2018-11-16
  • Swiss Tradition of Tavillonnage
    I spotted this excellent article on Swiss wood shingling on the BBC today. (See link below)http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20181115-switzerlands-artfully-tedious-jobI have only done one wood shingled roof and I absolutely hated it because it was so tedious. The roof these Swiss masters are doing in the article makes what I did seem like childs play. Oh, what I would do to be able to move to the Swiss Alps. The only mountains we have in Nebraska are from the piles of corn after harvest.Link to Youtube ... read more
    Source: Frontier CarpenterPublished on 2018-11-16
  • E-mando(s)
    If you’ve been looking at the blog lately, you would have seen me sawing big chunks of wood by hand; so, for a change I’ve been cutting some aluminium.I’ve just completed two e-mando tailpieces; one for Pete’s e-mando which you’ve seen already and the second for Dave’s electric octave mandolin which is still on the drawing board (but hey, I know it needs a tailpiece!). Here are a few photos to give you a flavour of the process.And here is ... read more
    Source: A Luthier’s BlogPublished on 2018-11-16
  • The Bandsaw and Me
    I have put out an introduction to bandsaws video to help people who might seriously consider using a bandsaw. The reason is probably obvious but I have used one for five decades now and feel that owning will be helpful to others for a variety of reasons. I know it’s often said that I don’t […] Read the full post The Bandsaw and Me on Paul Sellers' Blog. ... read more
    Source: Paul Sellers’ BlogPublished on 2018-11-16
  • last minute Harry……
    Normally, I don't let things go on forever that need my attention. However, comma, back slash, double ditto things, I want to be absolute sure before I remove my window AC unit. You never know with the screwball weather of late. It could shoot up into the 80's and have 100% humidity just like that. Nobody would be laughing at me then when my AC is running keeping me cool.I downsized with a new AC this yearSince the forecast says ... read more
    Source: Accidental WoodworkerPublished on 2018-11-16
  • How to Use a Rabbet Plane
    (This post was originally publishedin December, 2010. Few changes have been made.) There are many ways to make a rabbets: moving fillister, plow/chisel, shoulder plane, table saw, etc. Know that you will need to be comfortable with, at least, one of these methods to use hollows and rounds successfully. I often choose using only a rabbet plane for most of the moldings I make. A rabbet plane is an easy plane to set up. There are no depth stops and no fences, which is an enormous advantage. ... read more
    Source: Musings from Big PinkPublished on 2018-11-16
  • Pinch Sticks Plus
    We nearly always use pinch sticks to record and transfer the distance between two points–in this case the span between the jambs of a door frame. It occurred to us that the addition of a slight tweak to the design of the sticks would also allow us to determine and record the midpoint of that distance. All you need do is bisect the width of the pinch sticks along their length. (Fix it permanently with a scribe line darkened ... read more
    Source: BH&EPublished on 2018-11-16
  • Wait, I Can’t Smell Kitty Litter
    I don’t talk much about the logistical side of Lost Art Press because it’s not woodworking. And I try to stick to woodworking as much as possible. But occasionally, it’s necessary to drop the curtain and acknowledge a milestone. About six years ago, John and I filled every order from our houses. I had our order processing computer propped on a folding table, and I’d put my feet on the litter box as I manually printed out every label ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2018-11-16
  • Ways to Make Me Click a Button
    Some typical social media posts in my feed: “I’ve just received this crate of Triton tools to review. They’re awesome and…” Click. Unfollow. “This is the first in a series of unboxing videos on my latest acquisition. I can’t wait for you to…” Unfollow. “Here’s a tiny detail of my latest project. I don’t want to spoil the surprise. Any guesses as to what it is?” Nope. Unfollow. “To bring you more fantastic content, I’ve started a gofundme page…” Unfollow. ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2018-11-15
  • Easy Scrap Wood Turning Project: Earrings
    Make beautiful last-minute gifts on the lathe while trimming down your scrap collection. ... read more
  • Lump Hammers on Sale Now
    Visit the Crucible Tool website to purchase one of our lump hammers. They are $85 plus shipping. This is likely our last batch before Christmas. Remember: If you have a question about Crucible, please send your email to: [email protected]. — Christopher Schwarz (Illustration by Raney Nelson) ... read more
    Source: Lost Art PressPublished on 2018-11-15
  • Oz
    Australia. Imagine that I went there… When I started woodworking for real in the late 1970s, I had never been out of New England by myself. Barely out of Massachusetts. Then in 1980, I somehow made my way down to Drew & Louise Langsner’s in western North Carolina. Some years later, I started regularly going between here (Massachusetts), Pennsylvania and Langsner’s. By now, woodworking has taken me to some great places; 5 trips to England, one to Sweden, ... read more
    Source: Peter Follansbee, joiner’s notesPublished on 2018-11-15
  • Book Review: Mortise & Tenon Magazine, Issue 5
    We are excited to present the brand new fifth issue of Mortise & Tenon Magazine! Take a look at what Norm Reid had to say about it: Once again, Joshua Klein and his co-editor Michael Updegraff have brought forth an eclectic and engaging gathering of articles about matters woodworking in Mortise & Tenon Magazine, Issue 5. As is their wont, the articles range widely in scope, emphasizing an historical perspective, with nary an electron-powered device in sight. While respect ... read more
    Source: Highland Woodworking BlogPublished on 2018-11-15
  • Back in 2013, Jameel Abraham, Raney Nelson, Jeff Miller,…
    Back in 2013, Jameel Abraham, Raney Nelson, Jeff Miller, Christopher Schwarz, Don Williams, Ron Brese, and Jon Fiant led the French Oak Roubo Project, where they built Roubo benches out of French oak slabs obtained from trees that were from the Palace of Versailles. I think this might be the other end of one of those trees.(At the Palace of Versailles, natch.) ... read more
    Source: Giant CypressPublished on 2018-11-15
  • Building an Early Texas Table
    This is an old video by Frank Strazza. He doesn’t produce videos for YouTube anymore which is a pity. In this short video he makes a small table which was commissioned by a museum. I hope you like this video, I found it enjoyable and even saw my little glue pot. ... read more
    Source: Journeyman’s journalPublished on 2018-11-15
  • More Mortise Chopping
    Seems I have an obsession with mortise chopping. Could be because that's about the sum of my shop time lately. As I posted before there are several ways to end up with a hole in or through a piece of wood.The main ones are: A hollow chisel mortiser, a chain mortiser, drill most of the waste and then pare the "Vs" and sides to size, and using chisels to waste the wood. Sometimes finding or having a chisel of the ... read more
    Source: I’M A OK GUYPublished on 2018-11-15
  • 55 Drawer Hardware Cabinet
    I have been getting requests to re-post this article, so here it is in all it’s dadoed and rabbeted glory. If anyone actually builds this thing please send a picture and will post it here. It would also be nice to know I and not the only one nutty enough to attempt it! Besides the article, I also wrote about it at the Lost Art Press blog last year so I won’t rehash all the details here. Furrels?Attached is the three ... read more
    Source: Eclectic MechanicalsPublished on 2018-11-14
  • Looks at Books
    I read a lot and I firmly believe that no matter how indispensable a YouTube video, a blog, or a magazine article can be, the long form of writing - a book - can both entertain and educate the way no other media can. Here is a short list of books that we stock, old and new that I think are worth reading. Now actually I think all the books we stock are worth reading, but I particularly wanted to ... read more
    Source: Joel’s Blog at Tools for Working WoodPublished on 2018-11-14
  • In my Popular Woodworking article on Chinese furniture, I…
    In my Popular Woodworking article on Chinese furniture, I discuss how the Chinese aesthetic influenced furniture makers in 18th century England and the U.S. Apparently French furniture makers were not immune to Asian influences, either.(At the Louvre and the Palace of Versailles.) ... read more
    Source: Giant CypressPublished on 2018-11-14
  • Holiday Gift and Exhibition at Pitt Meadows Art Gallery
    I am exbhibiting my 18-Piece 3D Jigsaw Puzzles and live-edge Cribbage Boards #16 and #19 at the Holdiay Gift and Exhibition, on at the Pitt Meadows Art Gallery November 17, 2018 to January 6, 2019. Opening Reception is November 24, 2 pm – 4 pm. For more details, visit the Gallery’s website. These items may be purchased through the Gallery, or may be ordered directly from me. ... read more
    Source: Flair WoodworksPublished on 2018-11-14
  • Beavering Away
    Why do I save the hardest for last? I guess just because I'm drawn that way.The middle short stretchers are ready to fit. The bottom short stretchers will have a dovetail so no mortise to chop. The mortises for the long stretchers are next, these are the largest mortises of the build, 32mm wide X 130mm deep X 145mm long. Come on Ibuprofen do your thing. Here is a photo of the first one after a couple or three passes.Maybe ... read more
    Source: I’M A OK GUYPublished on 2018-11-13
  • Windmills
    I have seen a number of videos about whirligigs recently and they got me interested in creating something similar.  I'm especially interested in the windmill portion of them.From what I have seen, whirligig makers start by making a hub with slots cut in it to hold the blades.  Some say that 35 degrees is the best angle so that is what I used.   I wanted 8 blades, so the slots are narrowly spaced.  To make it, I cut out an ... read more
    Source: Oregon Woodworker by Andy MargesonPublished on 2018-11-13
  • Upgrade Your Shop Accessories: Festool Sysrock & Festool Syslite II
    We all love spending time in our workshops, but what if we could make our shop a little nicer to be in by adding a couple of capable accessories? Listening to some music or a sports game would certainly make that sanding task go by more quickly. And a brightly lit space is much more enjoyable than a dark, poorly lit shop. The Festool Sysrock and Festool Syslite II can help. Take a look at the video below to see ... read more
    Source: Highland Woodworking BlogPublished on 2018-11-13
  • Other People’s Lathes – Dave Webster
    Some time ago, I asked all the purchasers of my Treadle Lathe ebook if they would like to show us the lathes they have built. A few responded with pictures and information. This is the second in a series of those responses. (1st one here.) Dave Webster appears to live somewhere in British Columbia, another Canadian. Dave mentioned that he acquired Stephen Shepard’s plans, and watched Mr. Chickadee’s lathe build on YouTube, and merged those ideas with my ramblings. I ... read more
    Source: Bob EastonPublished on 2018-11-13
  • Other People’s Lathes – Dave Webster
    Some time ago, I asked all the purchasers of my Treadle Lathe ebook if they would like to show us the lathes they have built. A few responded with pictures and information. This is the second in a series of those responses. (1st one here.) Dave Webster appears to live somewhere in British Columbia, another Canadian. Dave mentioned that he acquired Stephen Shepard’s plans, and watched Mr. Chickadee’s lathe build on YouTube, and merged those ideas with my ramblings. I ... read more
    Source: Bob EastonPublished on 2018-11-13